Let’s Talk About Depression

“You say you’re ‘depressed’—all I see is resilience. You are allowed to feel messed up and inside out. It doesn’t mean you’re defective—it just means you’re human.” – David Mitchell, Cloud Atlas

Tomorrow is World Health Day, and this year’s theme is Depression: Let’s Talk.

Depression is one of the most common mental illnesses in the U.S. and yet it’s still considered somewhat of a taboo topic to discuss. There’s a perception that depression doesn’t exist or that it’s nothing more than a personal problem or sign of weakness. This stigmatization surrounding depression stems from a misunderstanding of what depression is and is not.

So let’s debunk a few depression myths, shall we?

  1. Depression isn’t a feeling or reality that a person brought on themselves and isn’t something you can “just get over.” It’s a serious illness, not a character flaw. You wouldn’t accuse someone with brain cancer for being lazy and causing their own illness, so why treat people with depression this way?
  1. Depression isn’t simply being sad. Some moments in life—the loss of a loved one, moving away from home or failing an exam—warrant grieving. Depression and grief share some of the same features, but they are not one in the same. For example, grief is often fleeting, whereas depression lasts for weeks. Grief doesn’t typically affect self-esteem, but with depression, it’s common to loathe oneself and feel hopeless. Grief can lead to depression in some cases, but it’s important to distinguish the two.
  1. Depression isn’t just a woman’s disease. While it’s true that women suffer from depression twice as often as men, no one is immune from depression; it’s an equal-opportunity illness. All ages, genders, races and economic statuses can be affected.
  1. Depression doesn’t just affect the mind, but the entire body as well. It can negatively impact your immune system, making it more difficult to fight off infections and illnesses. It affects appetite, which can cause serious weight loss or gain. Headaches, stomach pain and other physical symptoms can occur if depression is left untreated. Unipolar major depression is the leading cause of disability, and only heart disease tops depression in causes of lost work days in the U.S.
  1. Depression won’t usually disappear if the sufferer ignores it for long enough and refuses to seek help. If treated, depression symptoms can decrease or even disappear. If left untreated, it could lead to failing health or even suicide.

About one in five people will suffer from a mental illness at some point in their lives. With those odds, it’s likely you already interact with someone who currently deals with from depression. Here are a few ways you can help support them and end the stigma surrounding depression:

  • Be the example. Take an online mental health screening at least once a year and encourage your friends and family to do the same. If you are worried you might be struggling with depression, make an appointment with Counseling and Psychological Services by calling 402.472.7450.
  • Educate yourself. The more you know, the better stigma buster you’ll be. Take time to research depression and other mental illnesses. A good place to start would be the Anxiety and Depression Association of America.
  • Watch your language. Expressions like “get over it” or “just relax” can minimize how a person feels. Instead use supportive language like “I’m sorry you aren’t feeling well” and ask what you can do to help.
  • Listen and be supportive. People who are depressed often feel isolated, so check in on them and ask them how they’re doing. Spend time with them when you can and know it’s OK to not know what to say. Showing them you care may motivate them to seek treatment if they haven’t already.
  • Be kind. Small acts of kindness can go a long way, whether it’s a simple smile to your fellow classmate who passes you on campus or inviting that friend you haven’t talked to in a while out for coffee to chat.
  • Share your story. Talking about your struggle with depression can help you recover and challenge stereotypes. It may even encourage others to get help if they need it.

For more information on mental wellness and CAPS services, visit health.unl.edu/caps

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